Preview: The Witch of Fulton Lane

 

Greetings, good readers! I’m working on a new book, The Witch of Fulton Lane. This will be my first supernatural story, and I’m looking forward to sharing it with you. In the mean time, here’s a little preview from the first chapter. Enjoy!

 

She had never been on an airplane before. She had only seen them in the picture books and magazines her mother provided for her, in order to fuel her imagination. In her books, the planes looked big and shiny, and the people on them looked so excited. They were flying to new lands; new destinations. Why shouldn’t they be excited? Planes went anywhere and everywhere. A few days ago, she boarded a plane for the first time ever, to visit the south. Today, her plane was flying both her and her mother home to New York, from an art festival in South Carolina.

The festival had lasted five days, and took place in a public park. Rue Maycriss and her seven-year-old daughter Dylan had flown in and arrived in time for the beginning of the second day. Rue was an artist, among many other things, and was selling some of her abstract paintings at the festival. Her husband, Marcus, had declined to join them on their trip. Instead, he had taken them to the airport, and agreed to pick them up upon their return.

At the terminal, Rue and Dylan sat side by side, watching the other passengers as they walked by. Rue looked over at her daughter and smiled. “Can you believe we sold all of our paintings?” she asked.

Dylan’s face lit up. “Everybody wanted one!” she exclaimed. “Your paintings are really good, Mommy.”

“Our paintings,” Rue corrected. “You helped me paint most of them. We should take the money we made, and open a savings account for you.”

“Can we really?” Dylan asked.

Rue nodded. “I think it’s a good idea,” she said. “Of course, we’ll have to ask Daddy, first.”

Dylan frowned. “Daddy won’t like it.”

Rue placed her arm around her daughter. “We’ll just see about that,” she said, with a wink.

Their flight was announced, and they stood up from their seats. The first class passengers boarded first, followed by unaccompanied minors. The coach passengers were next. As Rue led her daughter onto the plane and to their seats, she felt a sudden sharp pain in the pit of her stomach. Dylan noticed her discomfort, and placed her little hand over her mother’s. “Are you okay, Mommy?”

Rue nodded quickly. “Mommy’s fine,” she said. “I think I had too much ice cream yesterday.”

“That’s okay,” Dylan said. “When we get home, you can take the pink stuff.”

Rue smiled. When we get home, she thought.

As the plane drove out to the runway, Dylan looked out her window, and watched the other planes take off. A flight attendant passed through the aisle, checking to see if everyone was buckled in. As the plane made its way down the runway, gaining speed with every second, the sharp pain in Rue’s stomach returned. Damn it, she thought. Not here! Not like this!

            Dylan had turned away from her window and was staring at her mother. “Mommy?”

Rue tried to smile, but Dylan was an intelligent child, and she couldn’t hide anything from her. “Dylan, baby, do you remember what Mommy taught you? Do you remember how to hold things together?”

Dylan shook her head vigorously. “Yes, I remember. Why?”

“You’re gonna have to do that, very soon,” Rue said. “There’s something wrong with—”

The airplane suddenly shook violently. The lights flickered on and off. Passengers began to look all around, and the flight attendants stepped into the front of the aisle, trying to reassure everyone, it was only turbulence. Then the plane shook again. The cabin of the 747 suddenly went black, and a few people screamed. The captain was speaking over the intercom, stating it was just a little turbulence. What he hadn’t mentioned, was the 747 was having engine trouble.

“We’ve only been in the air for less than five minutes!” a man near the rear of the cabin shouted.

Rue shut her eyes, and took a deep breath. She held the silver pentagram, which hung around her neck on a black cord. Maybe, I can do it, she thought. Maybe I can fix it, and Dylan won’t have to…

            The lights inside the cabin turned on, and the plane stopped shaking. The passengers began to settle. Rue opened her eyes, and looked around, and found Dylan smiling at her. “You made it better, didn’t you, Mommy?” she asked.

Rue gave a sigh of relief. “Yes, I think I did,” she said. “Let’s just hope it holds.”

 

 

Forty minutes into the flight, the plane began to shake again. This time was worse than before. This time, oxygen masks dropped down from their compartments in the ceiling. People began to scream. The flight attendants were powerless to calm anyone down. Dylan looked out her window, and noticed thick black smoke, coming from one of the engines. Without turning her gaze away from the window, she reached out and tugged on her mother’s sleeve. “Mommy,” she whispered.

“I see it, too,” Rue said. “Dylan, it’s time. I need you to help me. I need you to help me hold this plane together.”

Dylan trembled as she nodded her head. She and her mother joined hands, and closed their eyes. Rue grasped her pentagram, as both of the plane’s engine shut off. The 747 began to descend, rapidly.

“Ladies and gentlemen!” a flight attendant shouted. “Please put your oxygen masks on, and fasten your seatbelts!”

“Just concentrate,” Rue said. “Don’t listen to the other people, or the noises inside the plane. Just focus on holding the plane together. Picture the outside of the plane, and hold it, really tight, with your mind.”

Dylan nodded her head and concentrated as hard as her seven year old mind could.

The other passengers were screaming and yelling; some were saying the plane was about to crash. The flight attendants tried to keep everyone calm, but even they knew they were in danger.

“Hold the plane, Dylan!” Rue shouted.

Dylan concentrated even harder, as the plane came ever closer to the ground…

 

 

http://www.woolastonentertainment.com

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